Pubs of Manchester

All pubs within the city centre and beyond.
A history of Manchester's hundreds of lost pubs.

Wednesday, 23 April 2014

Globe Inn, Corporation Street

Globe Inn, Corporation Street, Adelphi, Salford. (c) Neil Richardson, Tony Flynn, Alan Gall [1].

The Globe Inn stood on the corner of Mount Pleasant Street and Corporation Street, which was off Peru Street in the Adelphi corner of old Salford.  Pictured above is a picnic party outside the beerhouse held in 1937, courtesy of the rare, original 'Salford's Pubs 4' book [1].  The Globe can be traced back to 1851 and Cornbrook Brewery owned the property by the early 1900s, who survived closure attempts by the police and magistrates in 1907 and 1913.  The Globe was enlarged a few years later when the nearby beerhouse, the Ulster Arms, closed, and it lasted until the Trinity No.5 compulsory purchase order saw it off in 1959 [2].  Today, Mayan Close runs along the old route of Corporation Street and the Globe was about one-third the way down from Peru Street opposite this new small park.

Former location of Globe Inn, Corporation Street. (c) Google 2014. View Larger Map.

1. Salford's Pubs 4, Neil Richardson, Tony Flynn, Alan Gall (1980).
2. Salford Pubs Part Two: Including Islington, Ordsall Lane and Ordsall, Oldfield Road, Regent Road and Broughton (2003).

Rock Inn, Tatton Street

Former Rock Inn, Tatton Street, Ordsall, Salford. (c) Neil Richardson, Tony Flynn, Alan Gall [1].

The Rock Inn was at the easterly end of Tatton Street on the corner with Oldfield Road, opening in the 1860s.  By the early 1900s the Watson, Woodhead & Wagstaffe brewers owned the beerhouse and it survived the 1909 and 1910 brewster sessions, despite having rooms that were too small and a convicted gambler landlord that did the "long pull" (served oversized ales).  Although WW&W promised to improve on its four-per-week beer barrelage, the Rock Inn was handed to Walker & Homfray due to brewery financial problems.  Unfortunately the Rock was closed in 1913 and the building was used as dining rooms in the 1930s before being demolished in about 1970 [2].  The "Rock Inn" sign on the side of the building was still visible for the 50-odd years after the beerhouse closed [1].  Today in the redeveloped Ordsall the eastern end of Tatton Street on the corner with Oldfield Road is St Bartholomew's Drive.

Former location of Rock Inn, Tatton Street. (c) Google 2014. View Larger Map.

1. Salford's Pubs 4, Neil Richardson, Tony Flynn, Alan Gall (1980).
2. Salford Pubs Part Two: Including Islington, Ordsall Lane and Ordsall, Oldfield Road, Regent Road and Broughton (2003).

Monday, 21 April 2014

Imperial, Delaunays Road


Imperial, Delaunays Road, Crumpsall. (c) Alan Winfield with permission.

The Imperial was a strange-looking, industrial pub on Delaunays Road in Crumpsall, just south of the former Avecia, Zenace and ICI Building [1], now known as Hexagon Tower science and technology site in Blackley.  This 1966 photo shows its previous incarnation, possibly as a club.

Imperial, Delaunays Road, 2005. (c) Aidan O'Rourke [1].

The Imperial was popular enough with workers despite resembling more of a canteen than a pub, and Alan Winfield rates it as one of the worst two pubs in Greater Manchester - he should know having done pretty much every one in the 1990s.

Imperial, Delaunays Road,1999. (c) Aidan O'Rourke [1].

The Imperial was a Lees house with several function rooms, and lasted until the late 2000s before being pulled down to make way for new houses and apartments.

Former location of Imperial, Delaunays Road. (c) Google 2014. View Larger Map.

Halfway House, Middleton Road


Halfway House, Middleton Road, Crumpsall. (c) Alan Winfield with permission.

The Halfway House at No.2 Middleton Road at the junction with Bury Old Road and Leicester Road closed in the late 2000s and is now in use as Azmirana Solicitors office, retaining some of the old pub signage.  The Halfway House has its upper half decked out in mock Tudor, as seen in 1958 and 1971 as a Cornbrook house and 1985 as a Bass house.

Halfway House, Middleton Road. (c) Alexander P Kapp at geograph under Creative Commons.

An original Half Way House stood here, as seen in this 1927 photo taken on Bury Old Road.  Apparently it was at this original Half Way House that notorious burglar and murderer, Charles Peace, was captured [1]. 

Halfway House, Middleton Road. (c) Google 2014. View Larger Map.

New Inn, Rochdale Road

New Inn, Rochdale Road, Harpurhey. (c) Roger Hall [1].

The New Inn used to stand on the corner of Moston Lane and Rochdale Road in Harpurhey.  Shown above in the 1950s it's also seen here as a Chesters house twice in 1958, 1968 and 1971.  The New Inn was just south of the Farm Yard on the other side of the road, opposite the still-serving Top Derby and diagonally opposite the recently lost Golden Tavern.  The Wellington Inn was just a hundred yards or so along Moston Lane.  The New Inn was built in about 1829 and by the 1870s was owned by Chesters Brewery.  It passed to Threlfalls then Whitbread in 1967 but was bricked up and demolished in 1978 [1].

Former location of New Inn, Rochdale Road. (c) Google 2014. View Larger Map.

1. The Pubs of Blackley, Roger Hall (1980).

Gransmoor / CK's, Ashton Old Road


Gransmoor, Ashton Old Road, Openshaw. (c) Alan Winfield with permission.

The Gransmoor was a big Wilsons pub on the corner of Gransmoor Road and Ashton Old Road in Openshaw.  In the early 1990s Alan Winfield remembers a garishly decorated and predictably empty Banks's pub [1].  A subsequent name change to CK's didn't appear to improve the old Gransmoor.

CK's the former Gransmoor, Ashton Old Road. (c) Proprt.

CK's closed in the mid-2000s and the old pub has since been used as a second hand appliances shop, as mentioned on the 'A Brief Encounter' blog.  This also reminisces about the bands that used to play at the Gransmoor in the 1970s [3].

Former Gransmoor / CK's, Ashton Old Road. (c) John Topping at geograph under Creative Commons.

Former Gransmoor / CK's, Ashton Old Road. (c) Google 2014. View Larger Map.

Saturday, 19 April 2014

Wilton Arms, Mill Brow

Wilton Arms, Mill Brow, Blackley. (c) Roger Hall [1].

The Wilton Arms opened on Mill Brow in the 1830s after the Beerhouse Act, one of Blackley's first beerhouses.  It was named after the Earl of Wilton who owned land in Blackley village and the smithy who ran the Wilton Arms was a tenant of the Earl.  By the 1870s, Boardman's Brewery of Cheetham Hill owned the beerhouse and they rebuilt it as part of a terrace and it also had a billiards license.  

Wilton Arms, Mill Brow. (c) Roger Hall [1].

Cornbrook Brewery had the Wilton Arms by the start of the new century and it passed to Bass Charrington before demolition in the early 1970s.  The demolition was ordered due to a traffic scheme which never materialised.  The former location of the Wilton Arms is just to the east of the still-standing but closed Millstone (in the distance, below), opposite the looming Hexagon Tower, a science and technology site.

Former location of Wilton Arms, Mill Brow. (c) Google 2014. View Larger Map.

1. The Pubs of Blackley, Roger Hall (1980).

Cheetham Arms, Long Mill Gate

Cheetham Arms, Long Mill Gate, 1851. (c) Adshead at Digital Archives [1].

The Cheetham Arms is a long-lost pub that stood on the corner of what was Munday Street and Long Mill Gate, and which today is Munster Street and the top end of Corporation Street.  

Cheetham Arms, Long Mill Gate, 1891. (c) www.old-maps.co.uk/maps.html [2].

Situated between the still-serving Ducie Arms and the recently lost-to-the-Co-Op Crown & Cushion, the Cheetham Arms is shown above in Adshead's 1851 map [1] and the 1891 Town Plans [2].

Former location of Cheetham Arms, Munster Street/Corporation Street. (c) Google 2014. View Larger Map.

1. Adshead's Twenty Four Illustrated Maps of the Township of Manchester divided into Municipal Wards, 1851 at Digital Archives.

Haxby Hotel, Haxby Road

Former Haxby Hotel, Haxby Road, Gorton. (c) Pugh Auctions.

The Haxby Hotel is seen here in 1965 as a large (5,000 sq foot), imposing Threlfalls house, despite it bring tucked away at No.3 Haxby Road off Levenshulme Road near Ryder Brow Station in Gorton.  The Haxby Hotel closed relatively recently - I'd guess mid-late-2000s - judging from the photo at Closed Pubs.

Location of Haxby Hotel, Haxby Road. (c) Pugh Auctions.

The Haxby Hotel was really off the beaten track, directly off Yeadon Road, with Levenshulme Road to the west and Hemsworth Road to the south.  The old Haxby Hotel was up for auction and has recently been converted into what's now a huge private property. 

Former Haxby Hotel, Haxby Road. (c) Google 2014. View Larger Map.

Wednesday, 9 April 2014

Cromwell Inn, Ashton Old Road

Cromwell Inn, Ashton Old Road, Openshaw. (c) Manchester Local Image Collection. Click here to view full image [1].

On the corner of Wright Street and Ashton Old Road, boasting an Oliver Cromwell sign, the Cromwell Inn is shown here in the 1970s.  The Drovers, which still stands today although no longer serving, was across the road and a bit further towards town is the still-serving Queen Anne (ex-Lord Wolsey).

Cromwell Inn, Ashton Old Road. (c) www.old-maps.co.uk/maps.html [2].

The location of the Cromwell Inn can be seen on the 1891 map, between Wright Street and Cromwell Street on the south side of Ashton Old Road.  Today this spot is nothing but a strangely-gated car park.

Former location of Cromwell, Ashton Old Road. (c) Google 2014. View Larger Map.