Pubs of Manchester

All pubs within the city centre and beyond.
A history of Manchester's hundreds of lost pubs.

Wednesday, 9 April 2014

Cromwell Inn, Ashton Old Road

Cromwell Inn, Ashton Old Road, Openshaw. (c) Manchester Local Image Collection. Click here to view full image [1].

On the corner of Wright Street and Ashton Old Road, boasting an Oliver Cromwell sign, the Cromwell Inn is shown here in the 1970s.  The Drovers, which still stands today although no longer serving, was across the road and a bit further towards town is the still-serving Queen Anne (ex-Lord Wolsey).

Cromwell Inn, Ashton Old Road. (c) www.old-maps.co.uk/maps.html [2].

The location of the Cromwell Inn can be seen on the 1891 map, between Wright Street and Cromwell Street on the south side of Ashton Old Road.  Today this spot is nothing but a strangely-gated car park.

Former location of Cromwell, Ashton Old Road. (c) Google 2014. View Larger Map.

Hand & Heart, Ashton Old Road

Hand & Heart, Ashton Old Road, Beswick. (c) Manchester Local Image Collection. Click here to view full image [1].

The Hand & Heart was a Chesters pub on the corner of Chapel Grove and Ashton Old Road in Beswick, pretty much opposite the Grey Mare.  Shown here in the 1960s looking down Chapel Grove, by 1971 the Hand & Heart was closed and in the process of demolition.

Hand & Heart, Ashton Old Road. (c) www.old-maps.co.uk/maps.html [2].

Although not shown on the 1891 map like the Grey Mare Hotel [2], the exact location of Chapel Grove and the Hand & Heart was just after Pottery Lane going away from town, where a Seamark unit stands today.

Former location of Hand & Heart, Ashton Old Road. (c) Google 2014. View Larger Map.

Tuesday, 8 April 2014

Neptune Inn, Murray / Masonic Street

Neptune Inn, Murray Street, Miles Platting. (c) Adshead at Digital Archives [1].

On what was Murray Street in the 1851 [1] and 1891 maps [2], but Masonic Street by the 1920s, Neptune Inn was at the top end, just one building off Oldham Road on the Ancoats - Miles Platting border.  A couple of doors and streets along Oldham Road from the Angel, the Neptune is shown on Masonic Street in 1935 as a Cornbrook house.

Neptune Inn, Murray Street, 1891. (c) www.old-maps.co.uk/maps.html [2].

The Neptune escapes coverage in the late Neil Richardson's superb (and still available) book [3], and just about comes under Miles Platting.  The old location of the Neptune is just north of today's Butler Lane where the first of the tower blocks stands.

1. Adshead's Twenty Four Illustrated Maps of the Township of Manchester divided into Municipal Wards, 1851 at Digital Archives.
3. The Old Pubs of Ancoats, Neil Richardson (1987).

Commercial Inn, Lime Bank Street

Commercial Inn, Lime Bank Street, Ardwick. (c) Manchester Local Image Collection. Click here to view full image [1].

The Commercial Inn was a Groves & Whitnall beerhouse on Lime Bank Street, north off Ashton Old Road in Ardwick.  Its sign advertises Red Rose ales, as per the rose sign favoured by G&W after WWII [2].  In the 1964 photo at the archives, the Commercial Inn is shown on the corner of Napier Street looking towards Meadow Street and Ashton Old Road beyond.

Commercial Inn, Lime Bank Street, 1891. (c) www.old-maps.co.uk/maps.html [3].

The 1891 map shows that building that the Commercial was or became, and also shows the Lime Bank Works that gave the street its unusual name.  What was once a busy residential and industrial street, and which used to run on to an iron foundry, is now a quiet, cobbled road with a dead end at the small council house estate off Viaduct Street.

Former location of Commercial, Lime Bank Street. (c) Google 2014. View Larger Map.

Sunday, 6 April 2014

Crown, Fairfield Street

Crown Hotel, Fairfield Street, Ardwick. (c) Manchester Local Image Collection. Click here to view full image [1].

The Crown Hotel is seen here in about 1970 what is almost certainly the corner of Fairfield Street and Chancellor Lane in Ardwick - here's the view down Pin Mill Brow with the Crown in the background.  The grand Chesters pub is seen from an aerial spot looking down Lyon Street, a lost street just west of Lime Bank Street, in the 1891 map below (Castle Brewery to the rear of the Crown).

Crown Inn, Fairfield Street. (c) www.old-maps.co.uk/maps.html [2].

The Crown must have been rebuilt at some point in the late 1890s or early 20th century as the small, square-shaped Crown Inn was clearly enlarged in later years.  Nothing but light industrial units, hidden behind advertising hoardings, stand on this spot today.

Former location of Crown, Fairfield Street. (c) Google 2014. View Larger Map.

Blue Bell, Pin Mill Brow

Blue Bell, Pin Mill Brow, Ardwick. (c) www.old-maps.co.uk/maps.html.

The Blue Bell stood on Pin Mill Brow on the corner with Crowther's Buildings in the norther part of Ardwick, as seen here in 1964.  It was a Wilsons boozer and was established in 1900, as the plaque on the front of the pub shows here, also in 1964.

Blue Bell, Pin Mill Brow. (c) Manchester Local Image Collection. Click here to view full image [2].

The 1891 map (top) shows the corner building so the Blue Bell had a previous use or was re-built as the Wilsons house a few years later.  Today this side of Pin Mill Brow - named after a cotton mill, see top - is a rather large shrubbery.

Former location of Blue Bell, Pin Mill Brow. (c) Google 2014. View Larger Map.

Brunswick, Grey Mare Lane

Brunswick, Grey Mare Lane, Beswick. (c) Manchester Local Image Collection. Click here to view full image [1].

The Brunswick was a Wilsons house on the corner of Gillingham Street and Grey Mare Lane in Beswick.  Seen here in 1963, the Brunswick's old side door was bricked up and the pub was looking in a state of disrepair, at least externally, but looked a bit better from the rear.  Gillingham Street appears to once have run off Grey Mare Lane, roughly where the new Beswick Library is.  This means that the old Bobbin estate pub might have been the Brunswick's replacement during the relatively brief existence of Fort Beswick.

Friday, 4 April 2014

Kings Arms, Union Street

Kings Arms, Union Street, Ancoats. (c) Adshead at Digital Archives [1].

The Kings Arms stood further up Union Street (described as the ugliest in Manchester) from the Grapes oppsite the Rochdale Canal.  It was on the corner of the tiny Darlington Street which had notorious back-to-back dwellings along one side.  The Kings Arms opened in 1830 at the time of the Beer Act, and closed in 1870 [2].  On what today is St Vincent Street was, in the 1800s, Pott Street and both Union Street and Pott Street ended where the canal cut through, although the little bridge over the water is long gone.

Former location of Kings Arms, Union Street. (c) Google 2014. View Larger Map.

1. Adshead's Twenty Four Illustrated Maps of the Township of Manchester divided into Municipal Wards, 1851 at Digital Archives.
2. The Old Pubs of Ancoats, Neil Richardson (1987).

Grapes, Union Street


Grapes, Union Street, Ancoats. (c) Adshead at Digital Archives [1].

The Grapes was an old beerhouse on Union Street facing the Rochdale Canal.  The street was described in 1849 by journalist Angus Reach:  "A more perfectly ugly spot you shall not find between sunrise and sunset.  Fancy a street one side of which is all mills... the grimiest, sootiest, filthiest lumps of masonry in all Manchester... On the other hand lies a canal... a ditch of muddy water, very much like rotten pea soup [2]."  The Grapes was just on the corner of New Islington, opening in 1811 and closing exactly a century later as a Chesters house [2].  Union Street used to run along the canal between the still surviving New Union Street and St Vincent Street.


Former location of Grapes, Union Street. (c) Google 2014. View Larger Map.

1. Adshead's Twenty Four Illustrated Maps of the Township of Manchester divided into Municipal Wards, 1851 at Digital Archives.
2. The Old Pubs of Ancoats, Neil Richardson (1987).

Thursday, 3 April 2014

White Bear, Hyde Road

White Bear, Hyde Road, Gorton. (c) Manchester Local Image Collection. Click here to view full image [1].

The White Bear stood on the corner of Kinley Street and Hyde Road in West Gorton.  It was between the Wheatsheaf and the Crown, the Holts house on the corner of Clowes Street, on the way into Manchester.  The White Bear is seen here in 1964, and a few years later showing its Hyde Road entrance in 1971.